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Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

12 Sure Fire Ways To A Recruiter’s Heart

This past week while working on a variety of openings, I began to think about the simple things candidates could do that would make connecting with them a lot easier.  The more I think about it,the more I realize that these are actually things that candidates can do to be found more easily. These are also things that will make you more appealing through the recruiting process.  Let me know if you have any other ideas I missed because we’re all in this together.

1) If you are on LinkedIn, update your status to read that you are looking for your next (fill the type of job you are looking for) position.

2) If you are on LinkedIn and are looking for work or would like to start seeing what might be out there, make it easy for people who are not connected to you first line to get in touch with you.  You can do this by putting your e-mail address and/or your phone number in your contact information which will appear at the bottom of the page.

3) If you are on Facebook, update your profile to note that you are looking for your next job or something like that.

4) If you are on LinkedIn and/or Facebook, having a current picture on those sites will aid recruiters in a number of ways. Whenever I find someone on LinkedIn who I’m not connected to 1st line and don’t have a way to connect through a group or by paid inmail,  I will search for them on Facebook. I do this because when I find them (and I have), I can send them a message and there is no cost and most likely they will get it quicker because most people check their Facebook more often than LinkedIn.

5) When you speak to a recruiter in regards to a position you are interested in, be prepared to update your resume and prepare a summary to highlight the skills that are most important to the job you are being considered for.

6) Be up front about clients you are already submitted to, been in conversation with, worked at before, or choose not to be presented to. It saves a lot of time and energy for both the recruiter and the candidate.

7) When returning a call or e-mail to a recruiter, let them know the best time and way to reach you.  In today’s market, timing is everything. If a recruiter cannot reach you in a reasonable amount of time, odds are you will be overlooked for a more readily available candidate.

8) Join Twitter, even if you don’t plan to tweet often.  Starting every day with a tweet that says you are looking for (fill in your job title) your next job and your location will be another way to be found.  More and more recruiters and search professionals are using all 3 of the previously mentioned social media sites to recruit as it appears they can find more candidates that way.

9) Always be up front about your availability. There is nothing worse than going through all of the steps to qualify a candidate, to only have them inform you that they are not available for a month.

10) Inform the recruiter what else you have in your pipeline. That should include offers and interviews at least. Once again, timing is everything in our industry and full disclosure isn’t far behind.

11) Have references readily available, and let them know that they should expect a call from said recruiter. Also, inform the recruiter of the best way to communicate with that reference and best time to reach them if possible.  If it takes 3 or 4 days to reach you references, you would hate to be the top candidate and bring the process to a screeching halt because they can’t contact them. Also, more and more reference requirements can be accomplished by way of a recommendation on LinkedIn.

12) Share with them what attracts you to working with their organization whether it be in a full-time or consulting capacity. If a recruiter knows what excites you, they can do a better job of representing you.

In most cases, the recruiter holds the key to the door of your next opportunity.  If you treat them well, it has the potential to be a meaningful business relationship long into the future.

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If Your Job Search Lacks Creativity And Drive, You Are Fighting A Losing Battle

This past Tuesday I had the good fortune to attend a networking event where the guest speaker was 5 time New York Times best selling author Harvey Mackay. His latest book, entitled “Use Your Head To Get Your Foot In The Door” centers around the little things one can do to overcome the challenges of the current depressed job market. In all of his books he has always been consistent in his belief that your next sale, job, or relationship stem from an all encompassing commitment to networking.

In an article published on About.com, CJ Hayden states that “surveys consistently show that 80-85% of job-seekers find work as the result of a referral from a friend or colleague, and only 2-4% land jobs from Internet job boards”.

I can’t agree more with her findings. But as a recruiter, I look at it from a slightly different perspective. In my case, her numbers hold true with the placements I’ve made over the past 3 years. On average 85% of my placements come from referrals and recommendations from personal friends, current and former colleagues and clients, and contacts from social media sites like LinkedIn and Facebook.

This is why I find it frustrating when people tell me that they are frustrated by the lack of results they get from only using job boards.

The definition of insanity is continuing to do the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

If you are one of the millions that are out of work presently, try doing something different to jump start the next phase of your job search.

1) If you haven’t done so already, get a LinkedIn account to get in touch with and network with former colleagues and friends.
2) Check out the 1000’s of networking groups on LinkedIn. I guarantee you can find many that will be a great networking vehicle.
3) If you are on Facebook, seek out friends and family to see who they know that you might be able to network with.
4) Every city has many great networking groups to fit a variety of areas from social to professionally focused that can help you in your job search.
5) Go where the people are, (Harvey Mackay notes in his book that volunteering is a great way to meet people and it’s a great way to stand out from the crowd).
6) Reach out to your educational institutions for ways to network through their resources
7) Get involved at your place of worship, mine has in excess of 1500 families and has people from many industries and career categories.
8) Find content on line that you can relate to and sign up for their newsletter or follow their blog. For instance, Harvey Mackay, Landon Long, and The Jobs Guy.

I agree that we are in a tough job market, however their are many ways to crush your competition if you just invest the time and effort and step outside your comfort zone.

Good Luck and happy networking.

Job Boards vs Social Media for Recruiting…Is The Quality and Result Worth The Cost???

Every day I talk to more and more of my counterparts in the recruiting business who are looking for more effective ways to recruit top talent without logging in to a job board like Monster, Career Builder, or Dice.com. When I have discussions with individuals in charge of the Job Board licenses for companies I always ask them the following questions.

1) Do you feel like you are getting the same high quality candidates from the job boards that you have in the past?

2) Do you feel like the thousands of dollars you spend each year on those job boards are worth the investment?

3) Are you using social media tools to recruit, and if so, are you finding as many quality candidates than you have with the job boards?

As we all know, job board licenses are very expensive, with a cost in the thousands of dollars per year.  On the other hand, social media tools like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook are being used to creatively to find candidates and the cost is virtually nil (LinkedIn does have professional licenses that start at $24.95 per month).

The recruiters goal is to the find ideal candidate for each of their openings. In today’s economically challenging times, our clients are utilizing more and more vendors as a way to find the best candidates as well as promoting rate competition among these vendors.  This puts an even bigger emphasis on recruiting costs as well as speed to market.  In addition,  many successful and well networked candidates never post a resume on a job board.

However,  in my experience over the past 2 years, none of the candidates I’ve dealt with are without a profile on one or multiple social media sites.

Gautam Ghosh one of India’s leading bloggers and commentators on Career, Work, HR and business issues wrote an interesting blog recently about recruiting and social media.

The job boards definitely serve a purpose today and have been extremely beneficial to my success throughout my career.  However, times are changing and social media recruiting accents what our industry has always known;  relationships are the key to successful job placement.

Check out our poll: What is your best resource for recruiting candidates?

Will Your Social Media Activity Affect Your Ability To Land Your Next Job Or…

Will Your Social Media Activity Affect Your Ability To Land Your Next Job Or Keep Your Current One???

Good, bad, or indifferent, Social Media is here to stay.  For many of us in the areas of Recruiting and Human Resources, Social Media can be a blessing and a curse for our candidates, employees, and friends.

Every day we learn more and more about how to search Social Media more efficiently and effectively.  Most of us in the recruiting world use it to find qualified candidates or to network.  However,  more and more it is being used by hiring managers, current managers, and those who decide whether we get promoted, demoted, laid-off, or dismissed to credit or discredit us.

In a poll conducted by Career Builder in January of this year they reported, “CareerBuilder also revealed that every 2 in about 5 employers did admit that they found some content on a prospective employee’s social network profile that discouraged them to actually employ them.”

A couple of months ago I had lunch with an HR Manager who had to dismiss an employee due to poor Social Media decisions.  This employee was informed that their department was being downsized in the coming month or so and most of the jobs were being rehired out of town.  This employee proceeded to post that information on a Social Media site; grateful that their job was safe unlike the rest of the people in their department.  As you can imagine, this caused an HR nightmare.  The about- to-be-downsized,  less fortunate employees began to cause quite a stir.  Many of them were vital to the upcoming transition and they started to jump ship and cause drama knowing they were not in the future plans of the company.  Needless to say, the employee that leaked the information was dismissed due to violation of the company Social Media policy and as a result, the company needed to replace that role and train a new employee in a key position.   Thich ultimately cost them financially and affected the productivity of the department and company.

Another more positive occurrence where Social Media had an effect on the hiring process occurred when I received a call from a hiring manager I did not know.  They were referred to me by someone I knew,  who was acquainted with a candidate they were considering.  I was not given as a reference for that person, but rather as someone who knew them from a character standpoint.  They saw that I was connected first level to them on LinkedIn and in turn they used it to reach out to me.  The questions they asked had nothing to do with business, rather my assessment of the kindness of this individual.  In this case, I knew this person through their involvement in volunteer work and other opportunities to give back to the community which I briefly shared.  This person did get the job they were interviewing for and this was one time Social Media payed off for a candidate.

The last example came through on our Twitter account in the past.  I will preface this tweet example by saying that these the words of someone else. These are words I find offensive, regardless of who uses them.

“Find me a job EXPLETIVE EXPLETIVE.”  (The expletives are incredibly offensive)

These words actually came from someone wanting my help finding a job.  Also, this is someone I’ve never met who must not understand that this information can be accessed by anyone who knows how to do a tweet search.

So remember, the next time you or your employees post an update, a picture, a tweet,  etc. on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Flickr, or the many other sites. It is something you can never erase once it’s posted (even if you go out and delete it).

Are you prepared for the findings of perspective employers, clients, and friends?

The Jobs Guy Becomes The Jobs Guys!

February 17, 2010 Leave a comment

First off I want to thank all the people who have been following, retweeting and mentioning  TheJobsGuy on #FF.  I was especially grateful for the outpouring of support I received when posted “TheJobsGuy Gets a Pink Slip” back in June.  A lot has changed since then.

For starters, I am working again, Whaa Hooo!!  I am working in search engine marketing for Mosquito Interactive.  We help clients get their products and services ranked and found on Google and other search engines and build effective landing pages that capture leads, sell products/services or both.  I love my new gig and one cool feature is I work from my home which works perfect for my lifestyle.  I can only wish the same good fortune to all of you who are currently looking for your next gig.

Secondly, TheJobsGuy’s audience has continued to grow and flourish and more and more people are reaching out to me for help.  Now that I have a full time gig I’ve been working nights and weekends to try and keep up with demands of  TheJobsGuy and my growing network of job seekers, HR professionals and recruiters.  To that point I have been fortunate enough to come into contact with a number of fantastic, like minded people, two of whom will be joining me at TheJobsGuy, hence we will be calling ourselves “TheJobsGuys”.  Imagine that!

So with that said, I would like to introduce Mike Finley and Steve Feinberg.  Mike is a social media expert focusing on using blogging and Facebook to find jobs or recruit employees.  Steve has a 10 year track record as a professional recruiter and is a true expert at using LinkedIn to find the right candidate in a short period of time, something I’m sure all recruiters will want to know more about if you are not seriously leveraging LinkedIn now.

Between the three of us we hope to be timely in our responses to your questions, comments or concerns and provide a steady stream of relevant content, and valuable training & consulting on how to use social media in your job search or recruiting efforts.

Thanks again for all your support and we “TheJobsGuys” look forward to helping you through your job search or recruiting challenges  and getting America working again!

What is your favorite tool or website for finding a job?

June 17, 2009 2 comments

OK, we have gotten some good responses on our poll but not a lot of feedback. Please comment below and answer these questions; Have you gotten a job through one of the tools/websites mentioned in our poll or some other method? and which one? what has been your experience with the different tools we list? Your choices are;
job boards – (monster, CareerBuilder, Niche boards, etc.)
Aggregators – ( SimplyHired, Indeed, etc.)
LinkedIn
FaceBook
Twitter
Direct to company
Recruiter
Newspaper
Personal network – (family, friends, organizations, etc.)
Search Engines – (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
see results or cast your vote

Please leave a comment!

Social Media Song

A message for young people about the dangers of social media and the internet.